Territories Wild - Netflix

Posted by Editor on Tue 11 June 2019

Join bowhunting pro Tom Miranda as he travels to remote destinations in pursuit of big game. Territories Wild also known as "Territories Wild with Tom Miranda presented by Mathews" is Miranda's video diary of his world class bowhunting adventures. From Dangerous African Safaris... to mountain sheep camps... wilderness rivers and desolate tundra... "Territories Wild with Tom Miranda presented by Mathews" is big game bowhunting at it's best. Few bow hunters have hunted the huge variety of animals that Miranda has hunted on camera for this television series. No matter the big game species, Tom dives into the location, tactics and strategies for success. An accomplished bowhunter, Miranda has taken over 60 whitetails on video and has taken the all 29 North American Big Game animals with archery tackle, being the first bowhunter to have documented the archery SUPER SLAM on video.

If it's big game bowhunting... Miranda likely has done it, including Africa's Big Six, Mountain ibex in Europe and Asia, as well as New Zealand stag, chamois. Australian buffalo and more. Documented hunts from tree stands as well as eye to eye "spot and stalk" hunts... witness full draw encounters and "over the shoulder impacts" as Tom Miranda hunts in Territories Wild. Miranda's television career has encompassed 26 years with 20 years on ESPN. Known for his down to earth camera presence and award winning cinematography... Tom Miranda's Outdoor Production Company produces 5 hunting series seen on 3 networks. High quality and in-depth coverage of the challenges of bowhunting big game.

Territories Wild - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2011-06-28

Territories Wild - The Wild Bunch - Netflix

The Wild Bunch is a 1969 American epic Western film directed by Sam Peckinpah about an aging outlaw gang on the Mexico–United States border trying to adapt to the changing modern world of 1913. The film was controversial because of its graphic violence and its portrayal of crude men attempting to survive by any available means. The screenplay was written by Peckinpah and Walon Green. It stars William Holden, Robert Ryan, Ernest Borgnine, Edmond O'Brien, Ben Johnson, and Warren Oates. It was filmed in Mexico, notably at the Hacienda Ciénaga del Carmen, deep in the desert between Torreón and Saltillo, Coahuila, and on the Rio Nazas. It was filmed in Technicolor and Panavision. The Wild Bunch is noted for intricate, multi-angle, quick-cut editing using normal and slow motion images, a revolutionary cinema technique in 1969. The writing of Green, Peckinpah, and Roy N. Sickner was nominated for a best-screenplay Academy Award, and the music by Jerry Fielding was nominated for Best Original Score. Additionally, Peckinpah was nominated for an Outstanding Directorial Achievement award by the Directors Guild of America, and cinematographer Lucien Ballard won the National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Cinematography. In 1999, the U.S. National Film Registry selected it for preservation in the Library of Congress as culturally, historically, and aesthetically significant. The film was ranked 80th in the American Film Institute's 100 best American films and the 69th most thrilling film. In 2008, the AFI listed 10 best films in 10 genres, ranking The Wild Bunch as the sixth-best Western.

Territories Wild - Production - Netflix

The film was shot with the anamorphic process. Peckinpah and his cinematographer, Lucien Ballard, also made use of telephoto lenses, that allowed for objects and people in both the background and foreground to be compressed in perspective. The effect is best seen in the shots where the Bunch makes the walk to Mapache's headquarters to free Angel. As they walk forward, a constant flow of people passes between them and the camera; most of the people in the foreground are as sharply focused as the Bunch. The editing of the film is notable in that shots from multiple angles were spliced together in rapid succession, often at different speeds, placing greater emphasis on the chaotic nature of the action and the gunfights. Lou Lombardo, having previously worked with Peckinpah on Noon Wine, was personally hired by the director to edit The Wild Bunch. Peckinpah had wanted an editor who would be loyal to him. Lombardo's youth was also a plus, as he was not bound by traditional conventions. One of Lombardo's first contributions was to show Peckinpah an episode of the TV series Felony Squad he edited in 1967. The episode, entitled “My Mommy Got Lost”, included a slow motion sequence where Joe Don Baker is shot by the police. The scene mixed slow motion with normal speed, having been filmed at 24 frames per second but triple printed optically at 72 frames per second. Peckinpah was reportedly thrilled and told Lombardo: “Let's try some of that when we get down to Mexico!” The director would film the major shootouts with six cameras, operating at various film rates, including 24 frames per second, 30 frames per second, 60 frames per second, 90 frames per second, and 120 frames per second. When the scenes were eventually cut together, the action would shift from slow to fast to slower still, giving time an elastic quality never before seen in motion pictures up to that time. By the time filming wrapped, Peckinpah had shot 333,000 feet (101,000 m) of film with 1,288 camera setups. Lombardo and Peckinpah remained in Mexico for six months editing the picture. After initial cuts, the opening gunfight sequence ran 21 minutes. By cutting frames from specific scenes and intercutting others, they were able to fine-cut the opening robbery down to five minutes. The creative montage became the model for the rest of the film and would “forever change the way movies would be made”. Further editing was done to secure a favorable rating from the MPAA which was in the process of establishing a new set of codes. Peckinpah and his editors cut the film to satisfy the new, expansive R-rating parameters which, for the first time, designated a film as being unsuitable for children. Without this new system in place, the film could not have been released with its explicit images of bloodshed. Peckinpah stated that one of his goals for this movie was to give the audience “some idea of what it is to be gunned down”. A memorable incident occurred, to that end, as Peckinpah's crew were consulting him on the “gunfire” effects to be used in the film. Not satisfied with the results from the squibs his crew had brought for him, Peckinpah became exasperated; he finally hollered: “That's not what I want! That's not what I want!” He then grabbed a real revolver and fired it into a nearby wall. The gun empty, Peckinpah barked at his stunned crew: “THAT'S the effect I want!!” He also had the gunfire sound effects changed for the film. Before, all gunshots in Warner Bros. movies sounded identical, regardless of the type of weapon being fired. Peckinpah insisted on each different type of firearm having its own specific sound effect when fired.

In 1967, Warner Bros.-Seven Arts producers Kenneth Hyman and Phil Feldman were interested in having Sam Peckinpah rewrite and direct an adventure film called The Diamond Story. A professional outcast due to the production difficulties of his previous film Major Dundee (1965) and his firing from the set of The Cincinnati Kid (1965), Peckinpah's stock had improved following his critically acclaimed work on the television film Noon Wine (1966). An alternative screenplay available at the studio was The Wild Bunch, written by Roy Sickner and Walon Green. At the time, William Goldman's screenplay Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid had recently been purchased by 20th Century Fox. It was quickly decided that The Wild Bunch, which had several similarities to Goldman's work, would be produced in order to beat Butch Cassidy to the theaters. By the fall of 1967, Peckinpah was rewriting the screenplay and preparing for the production. The principal photography was shot entirely on location in Mexico, most notably at the Hacienda Ciénaga del Carmen (deep in the desert between Torreón and Saltillo, Coahuila) and on the Rio Nazas. Peckinpah's epic work was inspired by his hunger to return to films, the violence seen in Arthur Penn's Bonnie and Clyde (1967), and America's growing frustration with the Vietnam War and what he perceived to be the utter lack of reality seen in Westerns up to that time. He set out to make a film which portrayed not only the vicious violence of the period, but as well the crude men attempting to survive the era. Multiple scenes attempted in Major Dundee, including slow motion action sequences (inspired by Akira Kurosawa's work in Seven Samurai (1954)), characters leaving a village as if in a funeral procession and the use of inexperienced locals as extras, would become fully realized in The Wild Bunch.

Territories Wild - References - Netflix