Picked Off - Netflix

Posted by Editor on Sat 29 June 2019

In this competition series, amateur antiquers are given the opportunity to acquire items that they think are valuable, in an attempt to win a cash prize. Each episode features four teams that begin with \$100 each to spend on one item. The teams dig through barns to find what they feel is the perfect item to pick. They then head to the "dealers room", where judges Todd and Ethan Merrill put a retail value on each team's item. The team with the lowest appraisal is eliminate -- or "picked off", in the show's terminology -- with the remaining teams advancing to the next elimination challenge, using their profits from the first challenge. The two remaining teams after the second challenge then compete in a final, winner-take-all challenge for the \$10,000 grand prize. Each episode takes place in a different location with challenges that reflect each locale's culture and history.

Picked Off - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2012-07-11

Picked Off - Batting order (baseball) - Netflix

In baseball, the batting order or batting lineup is the sequence in which the members of the offense take their turns in batting against the pitcher. The batting order is the main component of a team's offensive strategy. In Major League Baseball, the batting order is set by the manager, who before the game begins must present the home plate umpire with two copies of his team's lineup card, a card on which a team's starting batting order is recorded. The home plate umpire keeps one copy of the lineup card of each team, and gives the second copy to the opposing manager. Once the home plate umpire gives the lineup cards to the opposing managers, the batting lineup is final and a manager can only make changes under the Official Baseball Rules governing substitutions. If a team bats out of order, it is a violation of baseball's rules and subject to penalty. According to The Dickson Baseball Dictionary, a team has “batted around” when each of the nine batters in the team's lineup has made a plate appearance, and the first batter is coming up again during a single inning. Dictionary.com, however, defines “bat around” as “to have every player in the lineup take a turn at bat during a single inning.” It is not an official statistic. Opinions differ as to whether nine batters must get an at-bat, or if the opening batter must bat again for “batting around” to have occurred. In modern American baseball, some batting positions have nicknames: “leadoff” for first, “cleanup” for fourth, and “last” for ninth. Others are known by the ordinal numbers or the term #-hole (3rd place hitter would be 3-hole). In similar fashion, the third, fourth, and fifth batters are often collectively referred to as the “heart” or “meat” of the batting order, while the seventh, eighth, and ninth batters are called the “bottom of the lineup,” a designation generally referring both to their hitting position and to their typical lack of offensive prowess. At the start of each inning, the batting order resumes where it left off in the previous inning, rather than resetting to start with the #1 hitter again. If the current batter has not finished his at-bat, by either putting a ball in play or being struck-out, and another baserunner becomes a third out, such as being picked-off or caught stealing, the current batter will lead off the next inning, with the pitch count reset to 0-0. While this ensures that the players all bat roughly the same number of times, the game will almost always end before the last cycle is complete, so that the #1 hitter (for example) almost always has one plate appearance more than the #9 hitter, which is a significant enough difference to affect tactical decisions. This is not a perfect correlation to each batter's official count of “at-bats,” as a sacrifice (bunt or fly) that advances a runner, or a walk (base on balls or hit by pitch) is not recorded as an “at-bat” as these are largely out of the batter's control, and does not hurt his batting average (base hits per at-bats.)

Picked Off - Bragan's Brainstorm - Netflix

On August 18, 1956, major league manager Bobby Bragan placed his best hitter in the leadoff position and the remainder of his lineup in descending batting average order. Earnshaw Cook in his 1966 book, Percentage Baseball, claimed that, using a computer, Bragan's lineup would result in 1 to 2 more wins per season. A recent computer simulation demonstrates the superiority of Bragan's lineup.

Picked Off - References - Netflix